• iStock/Thinkstock(LOS ANGELES) -- Los Angeles Police Chief Charlie Beck says he personally arrested one of his own officers on Thursday.Beck arrested 10-year veteran LAPD officer Robert Cain in what has become the latest scandal involving the department’s youth cadet program. The 31-year-old officer is accused of having a sexual relationship with a 15-year-old female cadet.The chief, who usually does not make arrests, said “I told him you’re under arrest for unlawful sex with a minor.”It is unclear if Cain has a lawyer.The officer is from the same police station, the LAPD’s 77th Street Division, that has been roiled in a scandal involving teen cadets who allegedly stole LAPD patrol SUV’s, crashing two of them in chases last week after they were spotted by on duty officers. The teens are also accused of stealing equipment like police radios and bullet proof vests.Beck says the teens pulled over drivers and impersonated officers with the stolen equipment but that they did not handcuff anyone.The 15-year-old girl allegedly involved in the sexual relationship is one of seven cadets who have been arrested for stealing the patrol vehicles. Cain worked in the equipment room where police gear is checked out. Beck says he is not sure yet if Cain helped the teens obtain the stolen items.When Beck learned of the alleged criminal conduct involving Cain, he said he made the decision to make the arrest himself.
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  • iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) -- Kevin Patrick Mallory, 60, was arrested and charged Thursday with espionage and making false statements for allegedly delivering top-secret and secret documents to a suspected Chinese spy.According to the criminal complaint, Mallory traveled to Shanghai in March and April and met with someone who represented himself as working for a Chinese think tank. However, the Chinese intelligence service often uses this organization as a cover for its intelligence officers, according to the FBI.The Chinese intelligence agency is known to pay their sources not only in cash, but also through other means like business considerations.According to the complaint, upon returning from Shanghai in April, U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) did a “secondary search” of Mallory when he arrived at Chicago O’Hare Airport.During that search, CBP found $16,500 in his two carry-on bags, an amount he did not declare on his customs form, according to court documents.Mallory allegedly told CBP that he was in China on a business trip as well as a father/son vacation.According to the complaint, between March and April, Mallory contacted former co-workers, to help put him in touch with an employee at a U.S. government agency, which is not specified in the court documents.The complaint also stated that during a subsequent meeting he told the government employee that he was given a communication device from the Chinese contact and he had been trained to use it.On May 24, he was planning to meet with that person again, but instead, he was greeted by FBI agents, at which point he volunteered to an interview and search of his device, according to the complaint.He told FBI investigators that he believed the contact worked for the Chinese intelligence service and that he was a former U.S. government employee who had “training and overseas experience, which made it easy for him to spot tradecraft,” the court documents read.He also told the FBI that he had been given a device and was trained to “use it specifically for private communications” with his Chinese contact -- someone he told authorities he was introduced to initially as a potential client, according to the court documents.During an FBI review of his electronic device, Mallory voluntarily showed agents how to move from normal message mode to secure mode.“When doing this, Mallory expressed surprise at seeing some message history,” according to the court document.One message he had allegedly sent said, "I can also come in the middle of June I can bring the remainder of the documents I have at that time."Mallory told the agents that it was a reference to “two white papers” regarding open-source information and that he was just stringing along the contact, according to the complaint.Upon additional searching, the FBI allegedly found additional messages, including one that read, “Your object is to gain information, and my object is to be paid for.”A handwritten index was also allegedly found on the device that described eight different documents. Four of the eight were found stored on the device. According to the complaint, of those four, three contained classified information and one was classified at the “top-secret level.”Mallory, who speaks fluent Mandarin, is self-employed with GlobalEx LLC, a company he founded in 2010, according to court documents.He previously worked for the U.S. government in various capacities. He held an active security clearance when he worked for the government, but it was terminated when he left in 2012, according to the criminal complaint.He made his initial appearance in the Eastern District of Virginia federal court Thursday at which he wore shorts and a tank top and requested a court-appointed attorney. A detention hearing is scheduled for Friday.The FBI searched Mallory’s home in Virginia Thursday evening. FBI agents were seen bringing boxes out of
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  • blinow61/iStock/Thinkstock(LOS ANGELES) -- As Los Angeles County sheriff's deputies were shooting at a pit bull that was charging at them, a 17-year-old boy was apparently struck in the chest by one of the bullets and died, the sheriff's office said.The shooting happened at about 3:45 a.m. Thursday in Palmdale, California, after deputies responded to a report of loud music, the Los Angeles County Sheriff's Office said in a statement. As the deputies walked up the driveway, a 60- to 65-pound pit bull "aggressively charged at the deputies and attacked one of them," biting the deputy on the knee, the sheriff's department said.At that time, a young man came out from behind an apartment complex and restrained the dog and took it to the back of the building, the sheriff's office said.Deputies were helping the injured officer and waiting for paramedics when "the pit bull came from the rear of the apartment and again charged at deputy personnel," the sheriff's office reported. "At that point, two deputies shot at the pit bull from a 5- to 7-feet distance, at which time, the pit bull retreated back to the rear of the apartment complex into the carport area."The deputies went to the back of the complex "in an attempt to corral the dog to prevent additional victims," the sheriff's office said, and as they walked to the rear carport area, they found a teenager on the ground who appeared to have been shot in the chest, the sheriff's office said. The teen was hospitalized and later died.The sheriff's office said "detectives believe when the juvenile came out from behind the building, which was approximately 40 feet away from where the shooting occurred with the dog, the juvenile may have been struck by one of the skip rounds." Capt. Christopher Bergner of the sheriff’s office said it appeared that the "skip round" that hit the teenager had ricocheted off the ground, the Los Angeles Times reported.The deputy bitten by the pit bull was also hit in the leg by a bullet fragment, the sheriff's office said. According to the Los Angeles Times, Bergner said in a press conference the deputy's injury also appeared to have been from a skip round that had ricocheted off the ground. He was transported to a hospital and is listed in stable condition, the sheriff's office said.The sheriff's department said the investigation is ongoing. Because this was a fatal deputy-involved shooting, separate investigations will be conducted by the Los Angeles County Department of Medical Examiner - Coroner, Sheriff's Homicide Bureau and Internal Affairs Bureau, the sheriff's office said. The Office of the Inspector General is expected to provide independent oversight during the investigation and the Los Angeles County District Attorney is also involved. "Once concluded, every aspect of the shooting is reviewed by the Sheriff's Executive Force Review Committee," the sheriff's office added.The pit bull will be euthanized, the sheriff's office said.Nicole Nishida, a spokeswoman for the sheriff's department, said the department's policy for using a firearm on an animal is, "Personnel may use firearms to employ deadly force when dealing with animals when they reasonably believe that death or serious physical injury is about to be inflicted upon themselves or others."The shooting of animals that are not a threat of serious bodily injury to a person has proved to be inherently dangerous to bystanders as well as Deputy personnel. Therefore, Department members shall not use firearms to shoot animals fighting with other animals (e.g., dogs)," Nishida said. "If it becomes necessary to destroy an injured (euthanasia) by use of a firearm and the conditions are such that there is an extended or inappropriate response time by the animal control agency, authorization to use a firearm on an animal must be obtained from an on-scene supervisor."Copyright © 2017, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.
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  • Facebook(NEW YORK) -- Newly released video in the Philando Castile case shows an emotional exchange between Castile's girlfriend and her then-4-year-old daughter moments after his shooting in July 2016.In the video, released by Ramsey County, Minnesota, police, Diamond Reynolds' daughter can be heard trying to calm her mother down moments after St. Anthony police officer Jeronimo Yanez, who is Latino, shot Castile, who was black, multiple times."Mom, please stop cussing and screaming because I don't want you to get shooted," the girl says in the video.In addition to this video, filmed in the backseat of a squad car, Ramsey County authorities also released a 30-minute interview police conducted with Reynolds.In the interview, Reynolds describes what happened in the moments leading up to Castile's shooting."And the officer, already with his gun blazing, cocked and everything, 'Don't move! Don't move!' Pop pop pop pop pop pop pop and took off," she says.As video from the interview continues, it's clear that Reynolds is unaware of whether her boyfriend survived the shooting. After hearing the phones of both investigators conducting the interview ping, she asks, "So what are they saying?"One investigator hesitantly answers to inform her that Castile is dead. Reynolds then breaks down in tears.At the end of the interview, investigators offer to take her to the hospital where Castile was pronounced dead.Earlier this week, authorities released dashcam video from the traffic stop showing the moment Yanez opened fire on Castile.On Friday, June 16, Yanez was found not guilty of second-degree manslaughter in the fatal shooting of Castile. That same day, the city of St. Anthony announced that Yanez had been fired from the police force.Defense attorney Earl Gray said that the "verdict was correct" and that the "jury worked hard." Another defense attorney, Thomas Kelly, that while Castile's death was a tragedy, he was "satisfied" with the verdict and "relieved" that the trial is over.Philando Castile's mother, Valerie Castile, responded to the verdict saying she was "mad as hell" and called Yanez a "murderer.""The system continues to fail all black people," she said.She continued, "I am so disappointed in the state of Minnesota. My son loved this state."
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  • digicomphoto/iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) -- A 30-year-old New York City man was arrested at John F. Kennedy Airport Wednesday after the FBI alleged that he was planning to travel to Syria to join ISIS.Saddam Mohamed Raishani faces a charge of attempting to provide material support to the Islamic State group, federal prosecutors in Manhattan said Thursday ahead of Raishani's initial appearance in court.If convicted he faces up to 20 years in prison.“Having already helped another man make that trip to ISIS’s heartland, Raishani allegedly acted on his own desire to wage violent jihad, planning to leave his family and life in New York City for the battlefields of the Middle East,” acting U.S. Attorney Joon Kim said.Court records cited conversations Raishani had with a paid FBI informant, telling him he regretted skipping a trip he arranged for an unidentified associate to join ISIS.“Raishani indicated that he felt humiliated for not having traveled with Person-1 to join the Islamic State,” according to court records.The informant later introduced Raishani to a someone he described as a "true brother" but who was really an undercover NYPD detective, according to court records. The undercover detective provided Raishani with a laptop he allegedly used to download pro-ISIS videos.According to court records, Raishani told the undercover detective that he was part of an online chat group of ISIS supporters, said he “did not watch the news because the media speak negatively of ISIS” and “indicated he no longer felt comfortable in America.”By April, according to the FBI, Raishani was debating whether he should join ISIS in Syria or in Yemen.He allegedly told the informant “that while it would be difficult leaving his wife and child to join the Islamic State he knew that he was making the right choice,” court records said.Raishani allegedly bought a ticket for a June 21 flight from New York to Istanbul via Lisbon. He was arrested at JFK Airport as he was about to board.Before he was due to set off, he allegedly said that "if he is arrested he will not care, because Allah would see that he tried," according to court records.Copyright © 2017, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.
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  • IPGGutenbergUKLtd/iStock/Thinkstock(WASHINGTON) -- Edgar Madison Welch, who fired shots in a Washington D.C. pizza restaurant in December, was sentenced to four years for federal and local crimes.Welch, 29, was arrested for firing an AR-15 inside the D.C. restaurant Comet Ping Pong, as he investigated an unfounded conspiracy theory dubbed "Pizzagate" that the restaurant was involved in a child sex-trafficking ring connected to Hillary Clinton.Welch "carried a loaded AR-15 assault rifle and a revolver into a Northwest Washington pizza restaurant, scattering employees and customers, and fired his assault rifle into a door," the U.S. Attorney's Office for D.C. said in a statement announcing the sentence.Welch received four years for a federal charge of interstate transportation of a firearm and ammunition and two years for a District of Columbia charge of assault with a dangerous weapon, to be served concurrently. He was also sentenced to 36 months of supervised release after pleading guilty to the charges in March.Judge Ketanji Brown Jackson called “the extent of the recklessness" of the defendant's actions "breathtaking" as she sentenced Welch Thursday.Upon his release from prison, Welch will receive a mental health assessment and will be placed on supervised release for three years. He was further ordered to stay away from Comet Ping Pong.Copyright © 2017, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.
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  • kaarsten/iStock/Thinkstock(FLINT, Mich.) -- The director of the Bishop International Airport in Flint, Michigan, believes a maintenance worker saved the life of the airport police officer who was stabbed in the neck during an attack Wednesday that is being investigated as an act of terrorism.The maintenance worker, who was not identified, jumped in and helped restrain the attacker, who allegedly assaulted airport police officer Lt. Jeff Neville outside the airport's TSA screening area Wednesday morning, Lt. Dan Owen of the airport Fire Department said Thursday.Then, Owen and the airport's Director of Public Safety, Christopher Miller, who had heard the commotion and were about 15 feet away, arrived at the scene within four or five seconds and helped restraint the suspect, Owen said.Officials said Wednesday Neville was able to stop the assault within a minute and "never stopped fighting" until the attacker was in handcuffs.The suspect, Amor Ftouhi of Canada, is in custody and Neville was listed in stable condition Wednesday and is expected to fully recover.Airport Director Craig Williams said Thursday of the maintenance worker, “I believe he saved Jeff’s life.""I’m proud of all of our responders," Williams said, adding, "I’m especially proud of him because he jumped out there and did something that is courageous. I’d like to say we’d all do the same thing, but I can’t even say that I would. I can’t thank him enough. I’ve already thanked him a lot. I’m just really proud that he’s part of this team."After Ftouhi was taken into custody and interviewed by authorities, officials said it appears the suspect "has a hatred for the United States and a variety of other things that motivated him ... to conduct this act of violence."During the attack, Ftouhi, armed with a roughly 12-inch knife that had an 8-inch serrated blade, allegedly yelled "Allahu Akbar," David Gelios of the FBI said. Gelios said the attacker "continued to exclaim 'Allah' and he made a statement to the effect of 'you killed people in Syria, Iraq and Afghanistan' and 'We're all going to die.'"No one else appears to have been involved and there is no information to suggest a wider plot, officials said.A complaint was filed against Ftouhi Wednesday for "violence at an international airport," but officials noted that there could be more charges in the future. The ongoing investigation is part of a joint operation with Canada, officials said. Ftouhi legally entered the U.S. in Lake Champlain, New York, on June 16, and later traveled to Flint, Gelios said.The airport, which was evacuated and shut down Wednesday, later reopened. All passengers were safe, officials said.Williams said Thursday that Neville is doing well and recuperating at a hospital.Neville has been an employee since 2001, Williams said, and is "well loved by everybody here just for his personality, his professionalism. He treats everybody with respect."
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  • Xinhua/Lu Rui via Getty Images(CINCINNATI) -- Otto Warmbier, an American college student who died just days after North Korea released him from prison while he was in a coma, was mourned at his funeral in his hometown of Cincinnati on Thursday.The funeral service began at 9 a.m. ET at Wyoming High School in Wyoming, Ohio, a suburb of Cincinnati, where Warmbier was the salutatorian of his 2013 graduating class. The service was open to the public but closed to the press, according to a press release from the funeral home.Hundreds of people were seen beforehand lined up outside the Pendery Center for the Arts, part of Wyoming High School, waiting to enter the auditorium for the service. Nearby trees were adorned with blue and white ribbons, the high school's colors, in honor of Warmbier.Warmbier's belongings from his time in North Korea, including the jacket he wore during a trial in Pyongyang that ended with his imprisonment, were displayed at the service.Bagpipes blared after the service as Warmbier's casket was carried out of the building toward a waiting hearse, followed by a long line of mourners.Warmbier will be buried at the Spring Grove Cemetery and Arboretum in Cincinnati following the service.The 22-year-old University of Virginia student was detained by North Korea for nearly 17 months before he was medically evacuated and flown to Cincinnati on June 13. He was then rushed to the University of Cincinnati Medical Center. North Korea claimed that Warmbier slipped into a coma after contracting botulism and taking a sleeping pill shortly after his sentencing.He was arrested in January 2016 at the airport in Pyongyang for allegedly trying to steal a propaganda poster while he was visiting North Korea on a sightseeing tour organized by a Chinese-based company. After a one-hour trial in March 2016, he was convicted and sentenced to 15 years of hard labor.At a news conference on June 15 his father, Fred Warmbier, revealed that President Trump called him a day earlier to ask about his son and the rest of his family. Warmbier said Trump, who was "very candid" during the telephone call, told him Secretary of State Rex Tillerson and other U.S. officials worked hard to negotiate his son's release.Fred Warmbier told reporters at a news conference that the North Korean regime deemed his son a "war criminal" and "brutalized and terrorized" him during his detainment.At that news conference, doctors from the University of Cincinnati Medical Center said Otto Warmbier suffered from injuries related to cardiopulmonary arrest and was in a state of unresponsive wakefulness. They said that scans showed extensive loss of tissue in all regions of his brain and that they found no evidence of botulism."This pattern of brain injury is usually seen as result of cardiopulmonary arrest, where blood supply to the brain is inadequate for a period of time, resulting in the death of brain tissue," Dr. Daniel Kanter told reporters at the news conference.He said Warmbier was breathing on his own at the time and his vital signs were normal but he could not speak or move voluntarily."He shows no signs of understanding language ... He has not spoken. He has not engaged in any purposeful movements," Kanter said. "He has profound weakness of contraction in his arms and legs."According to Dr. Jordan Bonomo, Warmbier had "no fractures to the bone and has minor blemishes on his skin. We see no evidence of an acute or healing fracture."Warmbier died six days after he was returned home."It is our sad duty to report that our son, Otto Warmbier, has completed his journey home. Surrounded by his loving family, Otto died," his parents wrote in a statement Monday."Unfortunately, the awful torturous mistreatment our son received at the hands of the North Koreans ensured that no other outcome was possible," they said.The Warmbiers added that they are "at peace" and "at home."The Hamilton County Coroner's Office in Ohio examined Warmbier's body after he died and announced t
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  • iStock/Thinkstock(FLINT, Mich.) -- The airport police officer who was stabbed in the neck at Bishop International Airport in Flint, Michigan, on Wednesday morning, was able to stop the assault within a minute and "never stopped fighting" until the attacker was in handcuffs, officials said.The suspect, Amor Ftouhi of Canada, is in custody and the police officer, Lt. Jeff Neville, was listed in stable condition Wednesday and is expected to fully recover.Officials said Ftouhi was outside the TSA screening area at the time of the attack.Ftouhi allegedly went into a public restroom, dropped his bags and "came out, pulled out a knife, yelled 'Allahu Akbar' and stabbed Lt. Neville in the neck," David Gelios of the FBI said. Gelios said the attacker, armed with a roughly 12-inch knife that had an 8-inch serrated blade, "continued to exclaim 'Allah' and he made a statement to the effect of 'you killed people in Syria, Iraq and Afghanistan' and 'We're all going to die.'" Neville stopped the attack and Ftouhi was taken into custody and interviewed by authorities.Officials said it appears the suspect "has a hatred for the United States and a variety of other things that motivated him to coming to the airport today to conduct this act of violence." No one else appears to have been involved and there is no information to suggest a wider plot, officials said. After the incident, a complaint was filed against the suspect for "violence at an international airport," but officials noted that there could be more charges in the future. The ongoing investigation is part of a joint operation with Canada, officials said. Ftouhi legally entered the U.S. in Lake Champlain, New York, on June 16, and later traveled to Flint, Gelios said.The airport, which was evacuated and shut down, later reopened. All passengers were safe, officials said.An airport official said Wednesday afternoon that Neville is "doing fine" and "resting comfortably" at a hospital.Copyright © 2017, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.
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  • ABC News(NEW YORK) -- Tropical Storm Cindy made landfall in southwestern Louisiana near the Texas border early Thursday morning, threatening to bring strong winds, rain and potentially-dangerous floods to several surrounding Southern states.The National Weather service has warned that the storm could cause "life-threatening flash flooding."Cindy is expected to move across western and northern Louisiana and into southeastern Arkansas between Thursday night and Friday morning, according to the National Weather Service. The service also warned that the storm could produce a few tornadoes on Thursday in portions of Florida, Alabama, Mississippi and Louisiana.The governors of Alabama and Louisiana both declared a state of emergency earlier this week due to the coming storm.It is also expected to dump a total of 6 to 9 inches of rain, with as much as 12 inches in isolated spots, over southeastern Louisiana, southern Mississippi, southern Alabama and western portions of the Florida Panhandle through Thursday. The storm's maximum sustained winds were close to 40 miles per hour when it made landfall early Thursday.
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